Sugar And Your Smile

Diabetes Overland ParkDiabetes is the most common autoimmune disorder in the United States. Over 29 million people have been diagnosed with Type I or Type II forms.

This disorder affects so many differing aspects of life, and often in ways you might not imagine.

Capillaries, the smallest blood vessels of the body, suffer damage from elevated blood sugar. Oxygenated, healthy blood is not able to then reach the further areas of the body. This includes the eyes and the fingers and toes.

But this also means that the overall health of the mouth is much more at risk due to diabetes. If you are diabetic, it is absolutely vital to take proper care of your oral health.

If you are diabetic, it is crucial to take special care of your oral health. In today’s blog, your Overland Park, KS dentist describes how your health might be affected by diabetes.

The Sugar In Blood Transfers To Saliva

High blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can affect the body in a myriad of ways. One aspect that is often overlooked is in the transfer of the sugar throughout our bodily fluids. And this includes your spit!

When you have elevated glucose levels within the blood, the body tries to reroute it to other fluids it creates, hoping to leave it behind forever. A key area it does this is through our saliva. The body is pushing the short-term damage of diabetes into the longer term damage of the teeth.

The saliva then creates a mouth that has bacterial food everywhere! It is like if you were creating your own soda to constantly fill your mouth. But tooth brushing or rinsing will not help while the glucose is elevated. You will simply make more saliva!

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is also much more likely to develop in diabetic patients. This can lead to gum recession, which leaves the roots of the teeth uncovered. Without the gum’s protection, infection can develop within the structure of the tooth itself. It’s important to know that 1 in 5, or 20%, of tooth loss is directly connected to diabetes.

Diabetic Dry Mouth

Like mentioned before, the body is constantly creating new fluids, and when your blood sugar is high, even more so. Your body pushes as much of the body’s glucose into the fluid, then secretes it with haste.

The primary avenue for the expulsion of this sugar is through urination. This rapid output of urine takes with it a large part of the body’s water supply, often leading to dehydration and dry mouth.

Our saliva is a highly antibacterial fluid, which is full of enzymes to protect our mouths. If their glucose levels are not maintained properly, diabetics see a greatly increased level of infection.

What Do I Need To Do?

Twice daily tooth brushing should only be your start, and daily flossing and an oral rinse are very important. As with any healthy patient, a solid oral hygiene regimen is crucial to maintaining a fantastic smile. Twice daily tooth brushing should only be your start, and daily flossing and an oral rinse are very important.

And very importantly, you have the power to minimize the damage to the body by keeping your levels similar to those of non-diabetics.For patients with diabetes, closely monitored blood sugars will make a large difference in the outcomes in oral health. You minimize the damage to the body by keeping your levels similar to those of non-diabetics.

Have Further Questions?

Contact Family First Dental in Overland Park, KS by calling 913-381-2600 to schedule your next appointment with our team and discuss how we can best plan your diabetic oral health care regimen!